Manually compiling your own FUSE file system on FreeBSD

This is a combined rant and tutorial. The tutorial is available further down, under its own subheading. :)

It started Saturday, when I decided to jump in and get my hands dirty with the FUSE API. I started looking for the API documentation, but couldn’t find any which were relevant for my needs. I found some describing the internal kernel API, but nothing describing how to USE that API.

I found some example code with instructions describing how to compile it. These instructions state “gcc -Wall hello.c pkg-config fuse –cflags –libs -o hello”. I got errors about directories not found and flags not recognized. Oh well, not too surprising. I was maybe a little bit optimistic in thinking it was as easy as replacing gcc with clang!

So I went on to google for cmd switch replacements, etc, to no avail. After banging my head on this for over a day, I figured it’s better to leave this problem for another day, and just go with gcc for now. I installed gcc, and… same problem!

I then tweeted, hoping someone would have some suggestions for me. Almost immediately, @badboy_ replied, saying it was displayed wrong, and some of it should be wrapped in ticks. Okay, so I tried gcc48 -Wall hello.c `pkg-config fuse --cflags --libs` -o hello. Now it was complaining about pkg-config not being a valid command. Okay, one step further. In a combination of frustration and joy I immediately ask where to find “pkg-config” for FreeBSD. @FreeBSDHelp mentioned pkgconf. I tried the substitution trick on this, and the command line went gcc48 -Wall hello.c `pkgconf fuse --cflags --libs` -o hello. Okay one step further. It’s now complaining about a missing package for fuse. Digging around the ports tree, I find sysutils/fusefs-libs. Install it, try again.. and voila! It compiles, and works.

I once again try the clang-for-gcc substitution trick, and it works as a charm now. I immediately uninstalled gcc. ;)

How to Compile Your Own FUSE File System on FreeBSD?

  1. Install the package sysutils/fusefs-libs
  2. Have some code which uses FUSE (let’s assume hello.c from http://fuse.sourceforge.net/doxygen/hello_8c.html)
  3. Execute: clang -Wall hello.c `pkg-config fuse --cflags --libs` -o hello

That’s how easy it is, really. Now if only someone could have written that somewhere it could be found. :)

Changelog:
2015-10-28: Replaced ‘pkgconf’ with ‘pkg-config’ according to @myfreeweb‘s tweet.
2015-10-28: Added freshports.org link to package name.
2015-10-28: Cleaned up some links, adjusted text to reflect the post wasn’t published the day I started writing it.
2015-10-28: Added profile links for twitter handles.
2015-10-28: Made the link to @badboy_’s tweet more visible and added link to @FreeBSDHelp’s tweet.

ELI5: FreeBSD Accept Filters

Five months ago, I wrote the following as a response to a Redditor who asked how accept filters worked in FreeBSD, and wanted to have it explained like they were five years old. I’m posting it here, because it’s a recurring question, and I’d like it somewhere easy to find. Original thread.

Without accept filters: Imagine if someone were to send you a message by letter. They’d send one sentence the first day, the second sentence the second day, and so forth. You’d go check that mail box every day, because the ‘new mail’ flag was up. You piece the sentences together, and after a number of days you have the full message.

With accept filters: Imagine the above example, but the mail box scanned the contents of your letters, and wouldn’t raise the ‘new mail’ flag until there are enough sentences to form a full paragraph (request). You’d spend less time checking the mail box, and you’d still process the message at the earliest possible time.

The advantage to this is more noticeable when you have to check many mail boxes at the same time, and can skip the ones which don’t have a full paragraph yet.

Error ID 10-T: IPMI Entering Coma

Today, I had an “accident” configuring my new firewalls IPMI. Okay, I’ll admit. It was a PEBKAC situation: I wanted to configure the firewalls IPMI to use a dedicated network interface, but the option was disabled in the web UI. So I used Chromes debug mode to force-enable the drop-down menu, selected ‘Dedicated’, and saved. After a few seconds, there was an error dialog box on the web interface stating it failed to save the settings. And bam, the remote KVM console was disconnected, and the web interface went dead. A bit of investigation revealed that the IPMI had dropped off the network.

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Converting a FreeBSD MySQL server to jail host with MySQL in jail

I have a FreeBSD 10.0 server which currently only runs Percona MySQL server 5.6 backed by ZFS. The SQL server doesn’t have a high enough load to justify dedicated hardware, but I also don’t want to run it as a virtual machine as I want to use local ZFS storage, and because of virtualization overhead. The server is dual-homed (DMZ and LAN).

The solution is to convert the server into a jail host, and run MySQL inside a jail. The overhead should be minimal to non-existing as I won’t be using VNET.
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FreeBSD jail server with ZFS clone and jail.conf

I’ll be using FreeBSD 10.0 AMD64 with root on ZFS, but you can follow these instructions as long as you have a ZFS pool on the system. It is assumed that the system is already installed and basic configuration is complete.

It should be noted that the benefit from using ZFS clones will more or less vanish if you do a major ‘world’ upgrade on the jail, for example upgrading from FreeBSD 9.2 to FreeBSD 10.0. This won’t be a problem for my setup as I’ll eventually get around to configuring sysutils/py-salt to automatically deploy my jails, and I’ll post about it when I do.
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FreeBSD package builder with Poudriere

I’m using FreeBSD 10.0-RELEASE on my file server, which will double as my package builder. I’d prefer to run Poudriere inside a jail  so that all its binaries and configs are confined there, but this is not a supported configuration, and Poudriere requires so many permissions the security benefits would be minimal, and it still encounters trouble.

This shouldn’t be a problem though, as Poudriere won’t expose any services, and the packages will be published by a jail utilizing read-only nullfs mounts.

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FreeBSD jail host with multiple local networks

My jail host is running FreeBSD 10.0-RELEASE and is directly connected to two local networks. One is my LAN, and the other is a DMZ for various internet-facing services. I don’t want my DMZ jails to be able to send network traffic directly to my LAN, and I need to set a default route for a jail depending on which network its IP-address resides for them to communicate outside of their local subnet.

To solve this, I’m going to use multiple routing tables, also known as FIB, which are manipulated with the setfib utility. I know I could have used the experimental virtual network stack (VNET), which is awesome, but I opt not to as it still has some problems with stability and memory leaks. EDIT: It seems that jails are able to use the ‘setfib’ command as well, so a firewall might be necessary to disallow communication between certain jails and destinations.

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